Image Image Image Image Image
Scroll to Top

To Top

Articles

The Volunteering Women of Worcestershire

No Comments
By Voices

On 28, Feb 2017 | No Comments | In | By Voices

The Volunteering Women of Worcestershire

Alice Edwards, University of Worcester

When it was announced that Britain would be going to war in 1914, the lives of those on the home front changed. Communities looked to women of middle and upper class to organise charitable events, support the Red Cross, the National Egg Collection, the National Relief Fund or one of the other 18,000 charities set up during the conflict.

Read more…

From Flanders to Helmand: a study of chaplaincy and change in the British Army, 1914-2014 Helmand Chaplain

On 27, Jan 2017 | No Comments | In | By Voices

From Flanders to Helmand: a study of chaplaincy and change in the British Army, 1914-2014

Canon Professor Michael Snape, Durham University, and Dr Victoria Henshaw, University of Birmingham

This article examines questions of continuity and change in the religious experience of armed conflict, taking as its subjects the chaplains of the British Expeditionary Force (or B.E.F.) in France and Belgium between 1914 and 1918, and the mainly British component of Task Force Helmand (or T.F.H.) between 2006 and 2014. Drawing on evidence from both periods, including specially donated manuscript material and twenty-nine interviews with serving army chaplains, all of whom are veterans of Helmand, its findings reveal a remarkable degree of continuity between the experiences of chaplains in two very different operational contexts.

Read more…

Not Just Jam and Jerusalem: Pershore Women’s Institute

No Comments
By Voices

On 02, Mar 2016 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Not Just Jam and Jerusalem: Pershore Women’s Institute

Professor Maggie Andrews, University of Worcester

The greatest legacy of the First World War for rural woman was the Women’s Institute Movement in Britain.

Read more…

Refugee Relief during the First World War Refugee Relief during the First World War Refugee Relief during the First World War

No Comments
By Voices

On 10, Feb 2016 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Refugee Relief during the First World War

Belgian Refugees in Birmingham (1914-1919)
Jolien De Vuyst, Ghent University

 

‘Black is typical of the terrible days through which our country is passing, and the depth of sorrow into which we have been plunged; red, is the blood that has been shed; but golden is the kindness of the British people, and never can the Belgians forget the generosity and warmth of their reception’. Belgian refugee priest, referring to the colours of the Belgian flag. (War Refugees’ Committee, 1914)

Read more…

Harsh Realities: The British Army and the Problem of 1915 Harsh Realities: The British Army and the Problem of 1915 Harsh Realities: The British Army and the Problem of 1915

On 23, Dec 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Harsh Realities: The British Army and the Problem of 1915

Dr Spencer Jones, University of Wolverhampton

At the beginning of 1915 Great Britain found herself locked into a major European war for the first time in over a century. This was a situation for which the country was not strategically, militarily, economically or psychologically prepared.

Read more…

These Dangerous Women

No Comments
By Voices

On 09, Dec 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

These Dangerous Women

Charlotte Bill, Clapham Film Unit

“My sister needs a film”, my contact said to me in a Community Resource basement on Brixton Hill.
“What’s the story?”
“These women in 1915 got together to try to stop World War 1.”

Read more…

Children in Wartime: The Effect of War on School Children in Pershore and the Surrounding District Children in Wartime: The Effect of War on School Children in Pershore and the Surrounding District

On 11, Nov 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Children in Wartime: The Effect of War on School Children in Pershore and the Surrounding District

Emily Linney, University of Worcester

The First World War changed the lives of many on the home front; an examination of the school logbooks and contemporary newspapers relating to Pershore, in Worcestershire, demonstrates that this conflict affected the everyday lives of even small people.

Read more…

Belgium Refugees in Pershore and Evesham

No Comments
By Voices

On 28, Oct 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Belgium Refugees in Pershore and Evesham

Emily Linney, University of Worcester

Between the months of September and December 1914, 250,000 Belgium refugees entered Britain fleeing the German invasion of their homeland; this was the largest flood of people into Britain to date.

Read more…

Memento to Memorial: Leicester’s War Memorial Journey Memento to Memorial: Leicester’s War Memorial Journey

On 07, Oct 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Memento to Memorial: Leicester’s War Memorial Journey

Dr Emma Login, University of Birmingham

When we think of First World War memorials, we may imagine great stone monuments such as the Cenotaph in London or Thiepval on the Somme, France. Yet, these structures frequently took many years to build, and for those with loved ones fighting overseas, and especially for the bereaved, a more immediate and localised response was necessary. As a result, communities constructed countless war memorial shrines in towns and villages throughout the United Kingdom. Read more…

Women Doctors in the First World War Women Doctors in the First World War

2 Comments
By Voices

On 16, Sep 2015 | 2 Comments | In | By Voices

Women Doctors in the First World War

Dr Martha Jane Moody Stewart in Worcester and Beyond
Dr Rebecca Wynter, University of Birmingham

Dr Martha Jane Moody Stewart was in 1915 the first female House Surgeon at Worcester Infirmary. Local records seemed to offer little more to the Worcestershire World War 100 (WWW100) volunteer researchers. They found she had graduated from Queen’s University, Belfast, and that she left Worcester soon after arriving. An old local history book implied (rather bluntly) that in wartime circumstances the hospital was ‘forced’ to employ a woman doctor, but made no mention as to the reasons for her swift departure.

Read more…

Sphagnum Moss

No Comments
By Voices

On 17, Aug 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Sphagnum Moss

Adrian Blackledge, University of Birmingham

During the Great War sphagnum moss played an important part as a substitute for cotton gauze dressings, as it was found to absorb liquids about three times more quickly than cotton, retain liquids much better, and distribute the liquids more uniformly. It was cooler, softer, and less irritating than cotton, and could be produced more rapidly and more cheaply.

Read more…

Glasgow University’s Great War: Chaplains and Theology Students Glasgow University’s Great War: Chaplains and Theology Students

No Comments
By Voices

On 03, Aug 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Glasgow University’s Great War: Chaplains and Theology Students

Alicia Henneberry, postgraduate student
Theology and Religious Studies, University of Glasgow

The Glasgow University Great War Project is remembering the many men who fought and died bravely on the front lines in World War I. For this particular facet of the project, I focused on an aspect of this war that took place much closer to home for those of us on the University of Glasgow campus. I endeavoured to uncover aspects of the lives of those who studied and served from the University of Glasgow’s Divinity Faculty – the Chaplains and Theology Students of World War I. Read more…

Mothers First! The Women’s Co-operative Guild’s Maternity Letters

No Comments
By Voices

On 20, Jul 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Mothers First! The Women’s Co-operative Guild’s Maternity Letters

Ruth Cohen, Independent Researcher

The Women’s Co-operative Guild is most remembered for its poignant collection, ‘Maternity: letters from working women’, first published in 1915. By then, it was a unique campaigning organisation with over 32,000 members, mostly married women from better off sections of the working class. Read more…

Archibald Allan Bowman’s war experience Archibald Allan Bowman’s war experience Archibald Allan Bowman’s war experience

On 06, Jul 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Archibald Allan Bowman’s war experience

Dr Jennifer Novotny, University of Glasgow

The First World War centenary is a time to reflect upon those individuals whose lives were forever impacted by the events of 1914-18. While there is a strong emphasis on remembering those who died, it is equally important to consider those who survived to become the living legacy of conflict.

Read more…

Shot at Dawn- Lest We Forget Shot at Dawn- Lest We Forget Shot at Dawn- Lest We Forget

On 22, Jun 2015 | One Comment | In | By Voices

Shot at Dawn- Lest We Forget

Central Youth Theatre

Shot at Dawn- Lest we Forget is a Heritage Lottery funded project, by the Central Youth Theatre, that focuses on soldiers who were executed for desertion and “cowardice” during the First World War.

Read more…

Women Munitions Workers and the Trade Unions

No Comments
By Voices

On 25, May 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Women Munitions Workers and the Trade Unions

Cathy Hunt, Coventry University

The women who went into Britain’s munitions factories during the First World War were encouraged and praised in their endeavours to ensure that the men at the Front were kept supplied with the weapons and military equipment that were so vital to the war effort.

Read more…

Connections between Great Wars; 1793-1815 and 1914-1919 Connections between Great Wars; 1793-1815 and 1914-1919

On 18, May 2015 | One Comment | In | By Voices

Connections between Great Wars; 1793-1815 and 1914-1919

Nick Mansfield, Senior Research Fellow in History, University of Central Lancashire

Britain has embarked on a massive public history jamboree to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. Its overwhelming storyline is emotive, which I suspect that the citizen soldiers who I knew as a boy, particularly those rural representatives that I Interviewed in the 1980s, would have found distasteful [1].

Read more…

Labour Unrest Amongst First World War Female Workers

No Comments
By Voices

On 11, May 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Labour Unrest Amongst First World War Female Workers

Chris Day and Vicky Iglikowski, The National Archives

There is a distinct image of female munitions workers during the First World War which occupies perhaps the most prominent place in Britain’s collective memory; the patriotic women who, though jaundiced and slowly poisoned, were proud to be doing ‘their bit’ and eager to take advantage of the new world of employment offered to them by the war.

Read more…

‘Remembering World War One’ Module ‘Remembering World War One’ Module

On 20, Apr 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

‘Remembering World War One’ Module

Anna Young, Assistant Curator
Research & Cultural Collections, University of Birmingham

During the first week of spring term, Research and Cultural Collections welcomed students from the first cohort of the new English module, Remembering World War One. This module is set to run for the duration of the commemorative period and is designed to introduce students to the shock of the war – its historical, cultural and psychological enormity and incomprehensibility – as it was expressed by writers who experienced it and lived through its aftermath. Read more…

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families Association, County Dublin Division, 1914: a case study

No Comments
By Voices

On 23, Mar 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families Association, County Dublin Division, 1914: a case study

Paul Huddie, Queen’s University Belfast

One prominent feature of the British home front campaign of the Great War was the boom in wartime charities. So great was the expansion of charitable (or allegedly charitable) endeavours during and after 1914 that the War Charities Act 1916 had to be passed in order to regulate them. However before that great charitable rage took place, at the outbreak of the war, a number of such organisations were already well-established. One such charity was the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Families’ Association (SSFA).

Read more…

Girl Guides: Gender and Childhood on the Home Front

No Comments
By Voices

On 09, Mar 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Girl Guides: Gender and Childhood on the Home Front

Professor Maggie Andrews, University of Worcester

The Girl Guides Association, having been formed in 1910, was still a fledging organisation when the war broke out. The activities that Guides became involved in over the four years of war demonstrate both that life on the Home Front was a gender specific experience and the range of contributions that children made to the war effort.

Read more…

Sophie Carey and the National Food Fund

No Comments
By Voices

On 23, Feb 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Sophie Carey and the National Food Fund

Dr Katherine Storr

When the First World War began new charitable funds proliferated and many were started by women. Goods-in-kind, such as clothes and food were collected and distributed as well as money. Food is a weapon of war and Britain was vulnerable due to its reliance on imports.

Read more…

Exhibiting the Great War in 2014 Exhibiting the Great War in 2014 Exhibiting the Great War in 2014

On 02, Feb 2015 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Exhibiting the Great War in 2014

Prof Ian Grosvenor, University of Birmingham

Across Europe and beyond in 2014 the Great War took up residence in museums, art galleries and libraries, with exhibitions presenting the conflict through a national lens.

Exhibitions to be discussed here are Paris 14-18, la guerre au quotidien, a photographic exhibition at the Galerie des bibliothéques de la Ville de Paris, 1914-1918 Der Erste WeltKrieg at the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin, and Life Interrupted: Personal Diaries from World War I at the State Library of New South Wales, Australia.

Read more…

The Recapture of Gheluvelt, 31 October 1914

On 25, Nov 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

The Recapture of Gheluvelt, 31 October 1914

Dr Spencer Jones, University of Wolverhampton

The First Battle of Ypres

In October 1914 the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was locked into a battle for survival. Fighting alongside her French and Belgian allies, the British Army sought to hold off a massive German offensive that aimed to capture the last sliver of unoccupied Belgium before driving onwards towards the strategically vital Channel ports of Dunkirk and Calais.

Read more…

The Silenced War The Silenced War

On 17, Nov 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

The Silenced War

Fiction for Children across World War One
Prof Jean Webb, University of Worcester

The attitudes toward warfare in Britain leading up to World War I were deeply rooted in nineteenth-century notions of masculinity embedded in adventure stories for boys and therefore, by polar opposition, in the domestic construction of the feminine. Read more…

The Women Left Behind

No Comments
By Voices

On 10, Nov 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

The Women Left Behind

Soldiers’ Widows in First World War Britain
Dr Janis Lomas

The 31st of October 2014 is the centenary of the Battle of Gheluvelt, which has an almost mythical status in Worcestershire. Given the high casualty rate it is worth also considering the provisions that the British government put in place to provide for the families of men fighting in the First World War.

Read more…

Manchester’s Voices of Peace Manchester’s Voices of Peace

No Comments
By Voices

On 03, Nov 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Manchester’s Voices of Peace

Marcus Morris, Manchester Metropolitan University

Patriotic rallies, songs and flag waving, along with long lines of men volunteering to fight, are images that we traditionally associate with the outbreak of war in August 1914. A patriotic fervour and war fever seemingly gripped the nation, with whole cities turning out to cheer on their boys and show their support for Britain’s war effort. Yet this was by no means the only response to the growing threat of war or upon its outbreak, even if we are much less familiar with these images. Read more…

Zeppelin Raids Coroner's Report, 1916 [WAVE: T/CR/1916]

No Comments
By Voices

On 13, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Zeppelin Raids

Carl Chinn

On January 31, 1916, in the second year of the Great War, nine airships left their bases in Germany with orders to bomb Liverpool and in so doing shock the British by the long- range of the attack. The year before zeppelins had raided London, but it was considered impossible for them to reach as far north as Merseyside. As it was the enemy did not make their target. Instead they dropped their bombs on several English towns mostly in the Midlands. Chief amongst them were Tipton, Wednesbury and Walsall in Staffordshire.

Read more…

Menin Road and Remembrance Menin Road and Remembrance

On 06, Oct 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Menin Road and Remembrance

Carl Chinn

Ypres is a place that has seared itself into both the collective soul and the communal memory of the British people. An historic cloth town lying in the flat landscape of northern Flanders, it has come to symbolise the sacrifice of a generation of young men in the Great War. This metamorphosis of Ypres into a focal point of remembrance began in mid October 1914 when the area was overwhelmed by bloody fighting as the Germans strove to end the war quickly in a ‘race to the sea’. Their aim was to capture the Channel Ports and thus cut off the British Expeditionary Force from reinforcements and supplies from England.

Read more…

Breaking the Hindenburg Line Breaking the Hindenburg Line

No Comments
By Voices

On 29, Sep 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Breaking the Hindenburg Line

Carl Chinn

Is it something deep in the English national soul, that fascination with valiant defeat in battle? It is a trait bound up inextricably with others such as doggedness in the face of superior odds; a determination not to bow down to an aggressor, no matter how mighty he may be; a resolve to stay loyal to our pals and not abandon them when endangered; and a refusal to cry for quarter even when outnumbered and facing certain death.

Read more…

Rounding on the Germans Rounding on the Germans

No Comments
By Voices

On 22, Sep 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Rounding on the Germans

Chris Upton, Newman University, Birmingham

Kristallnacht – the Night of Broken Glass – was that fateful 24 hours in November 1938 when the German people (some of them, at least) turned on their Jewish neighbours. Families who had lived peaceably next door to each other for years became divided forever.

Such can be the effects of war and politics, and their handmaidens propaganda and hatred.

Read more…

The Fighting Warwicks and South Staffs The Fighting Warwicks and South Staffs

2 Comments
By Voices

On 15, Sep 2014 | 2 Comments | In | By Voices

The Fighting Warwicks and South Staffs

Carl Chinn

A heavy haze overlaid the Somme Valley early on July 1, 1916, but as the morning strengthened so the mist vanished. The clear sky beckoned the sun, which waxed in strength as the hours went on. After a week of thunderstorms, heavy rain, cloud and high winds, at last it looked set for a fine day of weather. A fine day that would become ingrained in the consciousness of the British people as the worst of days; a fine day that would witness the deaths of tens of thousands of fine men; a fine day when the youth of whole towns and districts were slaughtered; a fine day that became a bloody, tragic and shocking day from which so many families would never recover.

Read more…

Why Remember?

On 08, Sep 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Why Remember?

Chloe Howard, University of Birmingham

As an undergraduate student at the University of Birmingham, I have been working with Historic Royal Palaces to assess people’s attitudes towards remembrance of the First World War and the importance of the centenary this year.
Standing against the backdrop of The Tower of London’s magnificent ‘Blood swept lands and seas of red’ poppy installation, I spent a week asking members of the public to fill in a postcard questionnaire. Read more…

Happy Anniversary?

On 01, Sep 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Happy Anniversary?

Measuring the Impact, Legacy and Success of Anniversary Events
Dr Joanne Sayner

It is now expected that academics and museum professionals should reflect on the impact of work they have done. But how is such impact to be measured? How can we judge whether an event has been successful? This was the focus of a workshop recently held at Hampton Court Palace and attended by 81 delegates from a variety of institutions including those representing Government, academia, museums and heritage organisations, archives, and funding bodies. Read more…

Old Contemptibles Old Contemptibles

One Comment
By Voices

On 25, Aug 2014 | One Comment | In | By Voices

Old Contemptibles

Carl Chinn

The Kaiser was certain that his great army would sweep in to the sea that small force of British soldiers sent to help the French when war with Germany broke out on August 4, 1914. So sneering was he of the British Expeditionary Force that he commanded his forces to ‘exterminate first the treacherous English and walk over General French’s contemptible little army’.

Read more…

“The Loss of Such a Splendid Man” “The Loss of Such a Splendid Man” “The Loss of Such a Splendid Man”

No Comments
By Voices

On 18, Aug 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

“The Loss of Such a Splendid Man”

In Memory of Bill Furse
Henrietta Lockhart, Birmingham Museums Trust

During a trip to Northern France in June 2014, I visited the graves of some men whose stories we are featuring in an exhibition about Birmingham and the Royal Warwickshire Regiment during the First World War.

Read more…

A Summer to Remember: 1914, 1944 and ‘all that’

On 11, Aug 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

A Summer to Remember: 1914, 1944 and ‘all that’

Dr Sam Edwards, Manchester Metropolitan University

The commemorative events of August 2014 have at last initiated the long-anticipated season of remembrance connected to centennial of the First World War. The build-up of the preceding few months has finally given way to ceremony and solemn contemplation as Heads of State gather to lay wreaths of remembrance at sacred sites of memory: in Mons, at the Menin Gate, on the Marne. Seen from another perspective, however, the ceremonies taking place this August are not just a ‘beginning’; they also provide the closing parenthesis to a summer of memory which began on 6 June with the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings of 1944.

Read more…

Sergeant Alfred Knight VC Sergeant Alfred Knight VC

No Comments
By Voices

On 04, Aug 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Sergeant Alfred Knight VC

Post Office Shop

To mark the centenary year of World War 1 and the release of a range of collectible stamps and coins to commemorate this, the Post Office Shop blog team has been researching the role of the General Post Office during the Great War.

Read more…

Kitchener’s New Army Kitchener’s New Army

No Comments
By Voices

On 28, Jul 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Kitchener’s New Army

Carl Chinn

By the spring of 1915, the hoardings in Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds and other great cities were plentifully bespattered with Lord Kitchener’s posters calling for skilled workers to register for employment in munitions factories. One of the most striking was headed “the man the army wants now” and had an illustration depicting big guns in action with a workman engaged on a lathe in the foreground.

Read more…

Hurtling Towards War Hurtling Towards War

No Comments
By Voices

On 21, Jul 2014 | No Comments | In | By Voices

Hurtling Towards War

Carl Chinn

The bonfire for a European conflagration had been building inexorably for over a generation before the outbreak of the First World War in the summer of 1914. Over that period two great and hostile alliances had come together, tentatively at first but then more determinedly. As they did so they ever more fiercely cast grievances, ambitions, suspicions and hatreds at each other, so much so that language of diplomacy was increasingly abandoned for the rhetoric of conflict.

Read more…